What are precious stones?

Precious stones are defined as visually appealing gemstones created from rocks or minerals. Often used for jewelry and fashion accents, this term was created in the mid-1800’s to refer to four specific stones; diamonds, rubies, emeralds, and sapphires. All precious stones are translucent and are valued by the richness of their color, except for the diamond, which has a higher value based on being colorless.

Their rarity, beauty, and method in which they are produced all add to the allure of a precious stone. Any accessory containing a precious stone would be deemed sophisticated and worn by someone of high class.

  • Blue Sapphire

    Blue Sapphire (9)

    Ceilão was the name given to Sri Lanka by the Portuguese when they colonised the country in 1505, which was then called Zeylan by the Dutch and later transliterated into English as Ceylon when Britain colonised the land in 1798. Although the country gained independence in 1948 it was known as Ceylon until it was officially named ‘Sri Lanka’ in 1972. Sapphires from Sri Lanka are still fondly referred to as Ceylon Sapphires and are widely used in sapphire engagement rings and other fine jewellery. Sri Lanka, the island of exotic gems, has a colourful gem mining and trading history of at least 2500 years, if not more. It was once called Rathnadweepa which means Gem Island in Sinhalese. Persian traders endearingly referred to the island as Serendip; presumably because the discovery of such magnificent treasures leads to happiness, good fortune and luck. For many centuries, Ceylon blue sapphire have been treasured by royal families around the world. Renowned for their allure and range of blues; sapphires are considered a symbol of love, loyalty, power, royalty and wisdom. Some of the most prominent relationships royals have had with sapphires are the Ceylon Sapphire encrusted Imperial Crown of Russia worn by Queen Catherine II of Moscow, the Ceylon blue sapphire brooch given by Prince Albert to Queen Victoria on the eve of their wedding (also worn by queen Elizabeth II) and Princess Diana’s renowned engagement ring, currently worn by Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.
  • Padparadscha

    Padparadscha (3)

    Padparadscha is a delicate light to medium toned pink-orange to orange-pink hue corundum, originally found in Sri Lanka,but also found in deposits in Vietnam and parts of East Africa. Padparadscha sapphires are rare; the rarest of all is the totally natural variety, with no sign of artificial treatment. The name is derived from the Sanskrit "padma ranga" (padma = lotus; ranga = color), a color akin to the lotus flower (Nelumbo nucifera). Natural padparadscha sapphires often draw higher prices than many of even the finest blue sapphires.
  • Pink Sapphire

    Pink Sapphire (1)

    Pink sapphires occur in shades from light to dark pink, and deepen in color as the quantity of chromium increases. The deeper the pink color the higher their monetary value In Sri Lanka, a minimum color saturation must be met to be called a ruby, otherwise the stone is referred to as a pink sapphire
  • Ruby

    Ruby (2)

    A ruby is a pink to blood-red colored gemstone, a variety of the mineral corundum (aluminium oxide). Other varieties of gem-quality corundum are called sapphires. Ruby is considered one of the four precious stones, together with sapphire, emerald and diamond. They word ruby comes from ruber, Latin for red. The color of a ruby is due to the element chromium. The quality of a ruby is determined by its color, cut, and clarity, which, along with carat weight, affect its value. The brightest and most valuable "red" called blood-red or "pigeon blood", commands a large premium over other rubies of similar quality. After color follows clarity: similar to diamonds, a clear stone will command a premium, but a ruby without any needle-like rutile inclusions may indicate that the stone has been treated. Ruby is the traditional birthstone for July and is usually more pink. The world's most expensive ruby is the Sunrise Ruby.
  • Yellow Sapphire

    Yellow Sapphire (2)

    The enduring and alluring Sapphire forms in more colors than just the legendary blue. Each color exhibits its own unique metaphysical properties and vibrational patterns, yet all are Stones of Wisdom. They honor the higher mind, bringing intuition, clarity and self-mastery. Worn throughout the ages for protection, good fortune and spiritual insight, Sapphires are not only symbols of power and strength, but also of kindness and wise judgment. Yellow Sapphire brings the wisdom of prosperity, not only by attracting wealth and financial abundance into one’s life, but in its ability to manifest one’s creative energy into form through action. Yellow Sapphire stimulates the intellect, helping to formulate ideas and goals, then focuses that intent through the Solar Plexus Chakra, the will center, allowing one to hold their vision long enough to bring it into being. It also encourages the exploration of moving in new directions, bringing excitement and joyful expectation about the possibilities in life.